Designing Inclusion Programs: Are you Making this One Mistake?

Designing Inclusion Programs: Are you Making this One Mistake?

The time is now. Like so many leaders, you are thinking about meaningful inclusion and belonging initiatives for your organization. Your colleagues are eager to talk but don’t know where to start. And your commitment to diversity is strong and real.

There are many approaches to developing an actively anti-racist company. But to do it well – no matter what avenue you choose – you must avoid this one mistake.

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Making Virtual Work: It’s About Culture

Making Virtual Work: It’s About Culture

Let’s be honest: virtual connection just isn’t the same as human-to-human contact. But it can be a valuable tool for developing and sustaining workplace culture.

Virtual connection is an integral part of our organizational culture. We have learned that our mindsets and behaviors are more important than the software we leverage or the habits we practice.

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From Words to Action: Living Company Values

From Words to Action: Living Company Values

When we think of values, we often think of big nouns like trust, integrity, and moral responsibility. Values are words and standards to live by.

But one quick look at the stated values in today’s companies indicates an interesting trend – namely, that there are no nouns without verbs, and that values are nothing without actions to back them up.

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Pulling a Thread: Facilitating a Good Conversation

Pulling a Thread: Facilitating a Good Conversation

In deeply divided times, and with so many forces competing for our attention, a good conversation is rare. We can go days and months with only the most perfunctory interactions, often aided by social channels and digital devices.

Good conversations build trust, invite learning and break down barriers. But a good conversation takes work and practice – and, in today’s environment , a new set of skills.

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Pulling Back the Curtain: Building Conversational Muscles

Pulling Back the Curtain: Building  Conversational Muscles

Navigating today’s workplace takes the courage and conviction to call out behaviors that limit inclusion and the full realization of human possibility. But work can be the hardest place to take a stand. We are least comfortable “taking on” colleagues, let alone superiors, when we are keen to prove ourselves as “team players.”

How do we create the conditions to enable the courageous conversations we need for our organizations to benefit fully from the plurality of human perspective and experience? The courage to champion true belonging and inclusion – and to have the hard conversations – takes time and practice, and a commitment to a culture of openness and respect.

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The Power of Social Connection

The Power of Social Connection

Helen Keller once said: “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”

These words didn’t resonate with me until I participated in a discussion on Dafina Lazarus Stewart’s book, Multicultural Student Services on Campus: Building Bridges, Re-visioning Community, at the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion at John Carroll University.

Read more about Shanice’s insights into social learning and the power it brings to the workplace.

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Mindfulness as a Team Sport? Here’s How

Mindfulness as a Team Sport? Here’s How

It’s officially a “thing.” Many corporations have enthusiastically embraced mindfulness and meditation to enhance employee experience. With outcomes both promising and proven, it’s no wonder that the likes of Google, Apple, Nike, JP Morgan and General Mills have invested in the belief that corporate mindfulness improves workplace wellbeing. 

The numbers support the story. In a 2017 report on employer sponsored wellbeing, Fidelity Investments and the National Business Group on Health reported that 86% of the 141 employers surveyed include an expanded definition of employee well-being in their business strategy. Specifically, 61% were already engaged in or considering mindfulness classes or training, up from 43% in 2016.   

But meditation is usually a solo sport. Books@Work, like meditation, develops the skills to see things differently – but it allows colleagues to do it together.

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